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Integrating Genetics and Genomics to Advance Soybean Research



Improving Biotic and Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Soybean Using Existing Genetic Diversity and Genome Editing

To reduce the losses from biotic and abiotic stresses, it is necessary to discover and develop superior soybean lines that can be used to develop genetically superior commercial cultivars. We will identify the desirable genetic stocks carrying genes for resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses and use them to develop desirable cultivars that will sustain soybean production under environmental stress conditions. We will also evaluate the feasibility of engineering the effector-triggered immunity for enhancing disease resistance against four serious soybean pathogens through gene-editing.

BioProject: Not Submitted

Project Director:
    Madan Bhattacharyya, Iowa State University, mbhattac@iastate.edu

Co-Project Directors:
    Edward Sikora, Auburn University
    Ben Fallen, Clemson University
    Roger Innes, Indiana University
    Carmen Bain, Iowa State University
    Silvia Cianzio, Iowa State University
    Liang Dong, Iowa State University
    Chinmay Hegde, Iowa State University
    Sergio H. Lence, Iowa State University
    Chaoqun Lu, Iowa State University
    Daren Mueller, Iowa State University
    Dan Nettleton, Iowa State University
    Paul Price, Louisiana State University
    Martin Chilvers, Michigan State University
    Samuel Markell, N. Dakota State University
    Darcy Telenko, Purdue University
    Emmanuel Byanukama, S. Dakota State University
    Jacquelyn Jackson, Tuskegee University
    Channapatna Prakash, Tuskegee University
    Travis Faske, University of Arkansas
    Nathan Kleczewski, University of Illinois-Urbana
    Carl Bradley, University of Kentucky
    Kiersten Wise, University of Kentucky
    Dean Malvick, University of Minnesota
    Kaitlyn Bissonnette, University of Missouri
    Donald Lee, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
    Bijesh Maharjan, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
    Leah Sandall, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
    Dipak Santra, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
    Xin Qiao, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
    Damon Smith, University of Wisconsin-Madison
    Prakash Arelli, USDA-ARS
    Anna Loake, USDA-ARS
    Glen Hartman, USDA-ARS
    Devinder Sandhu, USDA-ARS

The overall goal of this project is to reduce soybean yield losses by 20% by 2050 while simultaneously reducing cultivation costs, especially under stressful environments. Specific goals are to (1) identify and generate soybean genotypes with enhanced resistance to diseases and enhanced tolerance to abiotic stresses; (2) train the next generation of researchers to continue genetic improvement of soybean; and (3) create an improved awareness among soybean growers of sustainable agricultural practices to increase soybean yields.

Soybean is one of the most important food crops globally. It is a major source of both protein and oil for humans, livestock and fish. In addition, its industrial usages include soy-based products and biodiesel production. In the United States, the total value of the soybean crop is $40 billion annually. Unfortunately, over 20% of the soybean yield is suppressed annually by biotic and abiotic stresses, which is expected to deteriorate due to climate change. Use of new genetic mechanisms to address biotic and abiotic stresses supports sustainable, environmentally benign soybean production, without additional input or cultivation costs. Development of cultivars with robust responses to biotic and abiotic stresses requires identification of the best alleles from across a broad germplasm collection. Identification and use of new genetic mechanisms to fight the biotic and abiotic stresses is considered ideal for sustainable soybean production because it does not add any additional costs to cultivation and is environmentally friendly. To reduce the losses from biotic and abiotic stresses, it is necessary to discover and develop superior soybean lines that can be used to develop genetically superior commercial cultivars. The rationale of the proposed research is that once we identify the desirable genetic stocks carrying genes for resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses, it will be possible to design desirable cultivars that will sustain soybean production under environmental stress conditions. We will also evaluate the feasibility of engineering the effector-triggered immunity for enhancing disease resistance against four serious soybean pathogens through gene-editing.

Data
    Click here to download a sample Soybean Science Institute (SSI) lesson plan.
    Click here to download the 2001 clusters of GRIN cultivars based on the SoySNP50K haplotypes.






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